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Project Icebreaker

Patrick Klepek at Giant Bomb:

Thomas Fenady was director of IT at Activision. He left in December 2009, and now works at Warner Bros. Fenady testified that in the summer of 2009, then Activision chief legal officer (now chief public policy officer) George Rose instructed him to “dig up dirt on Jason and Vince” because “we just want to get rid of them.” Rose said the decision came from Activision CEO Bobby Kotick.

Fenady claims Rose asked him to gain access to West and Zampella’s email, voicemail and computer, and “don’t get caught doing it.” Whatever happened in the course of seeking out this information: “Bobby will take care of you. … Don’t worry about repercussions.” Rose denied he asked Fenady to specifically “dig up dirt” in his deposition with Activision, though he did discuss Project Icebreaker’s existence and instructing Fenady to find information.

This is going to be a very interesting legal battle.

It’s also good to know that Activision appears to be just as detestable internally as many think from the outside.

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The Art of the Instakill

Neat-o mini-film on YouTube chaining a lot of ways to get one-shotted in video games right now:

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ModernWarfare3.com owner outed by GoDaddy

Joystiq:

Miami, Florida resident Anthony Abraham has been sitting on a very valuable URL for approximately two and a half years at this point. And though he’d hidden his identity through his URL registrant, GoDaddy.com, via its “Domains By Proxy” hiding service, a domain dispute from Modern Warfare 3 publisher Activision dissolved that shield this past weekend. Abraham is the owner of ModernWarfare3.com who has been seemingly trolling Activision for days now.

The publisher filed a domain-name dispute with the National Arbitration Forum, claiming that the site owner violates Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy. Rather than stand by Abraham, GoDaddy instead lifted the electronic shroud hiding the URL registrant’s name, opening him up to direct contact with Activision (and by extension, we imagine, Activision’s legal team).

Moral of the story?

Domain privacy isn’t.