Adobe’s Top 20 Passwords

Avinash Kaushik:

Adobe was hacked recently and of course someone smart is going to analyze the data to find insights. My favourite one was the top 20 passwords used by Adobe users.

38 million records were lost by Adobe, though the original number was said to be 2.9 million. 1.9 million people used 123456 as their password!

Here’s the image he included with his post:

36

Yes, people are stupid and these are ludicrously bad passwords. Shame on them.

But shame on Adobe for allowing users to set these kinds of passwords in the first place. Regardless of the hack, these are easily guessed passwords and could have led to account compromises without too much work.

Thoughts on Ebook DRM Standards

I’ve recently been performing some research into so-called “social DRM” as it applies to digital files for my own knowledge bank. I’ve been very interested in the approaches to DRM shown by groups such as The Pragmatic Programmers and ebooks purchased from outlets like Lulu, where the name of the purchaser is automatically embedded within the purchased file in order to provide it with some measure of discouraging sharing/piracy.

iTunes has done this from the start, and even though they have dropped the traditional notion of DRM from their music files now, they still mark each and every file you download with the email address of the Apple ID used to purchase the song. It’s not used in any sort of enforcement application (that we know of to date), but knowing it’s there stops some people from posting the tracks publicly or sharing them with anyone who is not a close personal friend or relative (my conjecture).

In doing this research, I ran across a two year old blog post from Bill McCoy of Adobe. He has some words to say about the same, which is fascinating coming from the GM of their ePublishing department. His comments are in reaction to the Steve Jobs note from 2007 regarding music and DRM—something that ended up happening less than two years after the fact. I also ran into some more recent comments from McCoy, speaking to the establishment of a DRM standard that is cross-platform instead of complete advocacy for the removal of traditional DRM systems from ebook titles.

Let’s talk about why this isn’t feasible and how we can learn from the past.

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